Archive for iPhone

May 1, 2012, Episode 257, Show Notes

Posted in Breach, Court Cases, criminal forensics, darkweb, ediscovery, eMail Security, Show Notes, The CyberJungle, Vulnerabilities with tags , , , , on May 17, 2012 by datasecurityblog

Episode 259 of The CyberJungle is about 22 minutes long.  You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below. The interview with Chester Wisniewski Apple Expert at Sophos Security begins at about 13:30min. You may download the file directly – great for listening on many smartphones. Or, you may go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show.

To listen to Episode 259 via the flash player:

Interview

From the floor of Interop Las Vegas: Chester Wisniewski Apple Expert at Sophos Security

Tales From The Dark Web

If you’re seeing ads on Wikipedia, your computer is probably infected with malware

Our Take on This Weeks News

ElcomSoft Helps Investigate Crime Providing Yet Another Way to Break into iOS with iCloud Attack

Apple posts twin security updates for OS X Leopard

Wrap

Heavy sleeper? Tired of snoozing past your alarm? Use the ‘smartphone in a cup’ trick to crank the volume!

iOS TrackerGate: Not New, But Still Disturbing

Posted in Court Cases, criminal forensics, ediscovery, eMail Security with tags , , , , , , on April 21, 2011 by datasecurityblog

The technical and non-technical press is buzzing over the “discovery” by a forensic researchers Alasdair Allan and Pete Warden. The revelations are not new, but the implications are still very disturbing.

Yesterday, Allan and Warden released a an application that uses an interesting plain-text file on 3G iPhones and iPads.  This file contains the geo location of where the device (and presumably it’s owner) has been.  The application blots the geo data onto a map, allowed one to see the travels and location of the device, and it’s owner.

The non-technical press has taken this story as a revelation.  Both the Wall Street Journal radio report out of the Bay Area (on KSFOAM) and The BBC World Service have been running this story all morning. Alex Levinson is a forensic researcher that has correctly pointed out that work by Allan and Warden did not credit the earlier research done by Alex, and others, in this area. Indeed, in a The CyberJungle posting from the Paraben Forensic Innovator’s Conference (PFIC) in Park City, UT last November, we reported the mountains of data that can be recovered from iOS devices.

The privacy implications of this data becoming available to in a civil lawsuit, or in a criminal matter, are quiet significant. Everything from visits to a mental health provider, a controversial art exhibit, a winery,  or a discreet meeting with an ex lover could become open to unwanted scrutiny.  It’s difficult to predict how the information regarding someone’s whereabouts could be used to harm an individual in a civil or criminal matter. We already have privacy challenges with the proliferation of closed circuit television (CCTV), and the ability to correlate the data with iOS geo data becomes an enormously powerful investigative tool.

Interestingly, yesterday also saw reports that Michigan law enforcement  maybe taking complete “in the field” forensic images of mobile devices from some drivers during routine traffic stops.  This revelation should cause any citizen to take a pause, as it has the Michigan ACLU.

What are some of the techniques the average citizen can use to add layers of privacy, and still use a mobile phone, or tablet?  We plan more coverage of this story in the next episode of CyberJungle Radio (episode 210), including options to help mitigate these privacy leaks.

by Ira Victor, G2700, GCFA, GPCI, GSEC, ISACA-CGEIT. Ira Victor is a forensic analyst with Data Clone Labs, He is also Co-Host of CyberJungle Radio, the news and talk on security, privacy and the law. Ira is President of Sierra-Nevada InfraGard, and a member of The High Tech Crime Investigator’s Association (HTCIA). Follow Ira’s security and forensics tweets: @ira_victor .

April 4, 2011 – Episode 207

Posted in Breach, criminal forensics, darkweb, ediscovery, eMail Security, The CyberJungle, Vulnerabilities, web server security with tags , , , , on April 4, 2011 by datasecurityblog

Episode 207 of  The CyberJungle is about 48 minutes long.  You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below. You may download the file directly – great for listening on many smartphones. Or, you may go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show. The interviews start at about the 26:30 mark.

To listen to Episode 207 via the flash player:

Interview

Rob Lee, of the SANS Institute and Mandiant: Defining the Advanced Persistent Threat(APT)

Our Take on The Week’s News

The Epsilon breach, read more in two blog postings at The CyberJungle, here and here.

News on the causes of the RSA breach, read an in-depth blog report from RSA/EMC

Pornwikileaks and a Health clinic under fire for alleged release of porn actors’ personal information. NSFW: Pornwikileaks

Tales from the Dark Web

If you don’t understand this basic cyber crime concept, you better figure it out this week, because there is a large-scale attack underway. The Websense link to the blog posting and video Ira mentioned.

Wrap

Cell phone panic button app sends emergency alerts

March 14, 2011 – Episode 204

Posted in Breach, criminal forensics, ediscovery, Show Notes, The CyberJungle, Vulnerabilities with tags , , , , , on March 13, 2011 by datasecurityblog

Episode 204 of  The CyberJungle is about 39 minutes long.  You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below. You may download the file directly – great for listening on many smartphones. Or, you may go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show. The interviews start at about the 30:30 mark.

To listen to Episode 204 via the flash player:

Interview

Interview: Trevor Dietrich, VP and Co-Founder of Bayalink Solutions, on a virtulization app to secure iPads + more. He’s seeking beta testers. Trevor’s Twitter Feed.

Our Take on The Week’s News

A federal district court in New Jersey has decided that a social worker and special education instructor employed by the school board are liable for violating a high school student’sprivacy… after the teacher handed out a poorly-redacted copy of the studen’t psychological evaluation as a teaching tool. Read the story here, or read the court’s decision.

Industrial Espionage at Renault, or poor forensics, or both? Some details in this Economist story.

California’s top utility regulator has given gave Pacific Gas and Electric Co. two weeks to propose a way for customers to opt out of receiving the company’s controversial wireless SmartMeters.

The iPhone 4 falls at CanSecWest Pwn2Own Contest, and Blackberry.

Tales From The Dark Web

Vehicle hacking via trojan MP3? Read the story here.


March 7, 2011 – Episode 203

Posted in Breach, Business Continuity, Court Cases, criminal forensics, ediscovery, Exclusive News, Legislation, Podcast, Show Notes, The CyberJungle, Vulnerabilities with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2011 by datasecurityblog

Episode 203 of  The CyberJungle is about 53 minutes long.  You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below. You may download the file directly – great for listening on many smartphones. Or, you may go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show. The interviews start at about the 25:30 mark.

To listen to Episode 203 via the flash player:

Interviews

Charlie Miller, 3x Pwn2Own “hacking” contest winner stays home; response by Dragos, Founder of CanSecWest . Follow Charlie on Twitter.

Tales From The Dark Web

Exactly what is the “boy-in-the-browser attack?”

Our Take on The Week’s News

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of capturing and sharing customer information without permission by tricking Microsoft Internet Explorer

Google Android in app malware flap, iPad2 security, and Blackberry Playbook running Android apps + better security? Interview on Playbook security Ira Victor mentioned in this segment. You may download the segment, or listen to the conversation here:

Via the flash player:

More mobile security news, Keeping Tabs on Android Smartphone Activity.

Proof once again that disgruntled employees are among the most dangerous cybercriminals… Texas man sentenced after breaching former employer’s network and deleting critical business files.

Wrap

OtterBox Cases for slider Smartphones: Samantha and Ira give a new OtterBox the field test

August 15, 2010 – Episodes 162 and 163

Posted in Breach, criminal forensics, darkweb, ediscovery, eMail Security, Show Notes, The CyberJungle, Vulnerabilities, web server security with tags , , , , on August 15, 2010 by datasecurityblog

Episode 163 is the this week’s full episode of The CyberJungle, posted immediately below.  Episode 162 is the su root edition for advanced listeners – material that’s too technical for the radio.  The advanced material consists of an interview with Wayne Huang,  who did early research that led to the discovery of the drive-by download.  Scroll down to the end of this batch of show notes to find it.

Episode 163:

This week’s regular episode of  The Cyberjungle  is 1 hour and 19 minutes long. You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below, or you can go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show.

To listen to Episode 163 via the flash player:

Interview

Wayne Huang is an executive at Armorize, working in Taiwan. His early research led to the discovery of what we now call drive-by downloads.  This episode of the Cyberjungle has a 7-minute interview with Wayne, which is a bit more elementary than the 35-minute su root version at the bottom of this set of show notes.  The 7-minute interview starts at about 24 minutes into episode 163.

Free Open Source Project to fight drive-by downloads is at Drivesploit.

Tales from the Dark Web

When your patch reminders pop up on your screen automatically, that’s a convenience.  When they arrive by email, that’s a scam.

Our Take on This Week’s News

Is Google buying microdrones like the ones in this vide0? And if so, what will Goolge do with them? Seems unclear at this point, but the implications kind of freak us out.

This is about as low as it gets: Cybercriminals pose as American military men — even fallen soldiers — creating fake dating profiles to ensnare women romantically and then ask them for money.

Everyone wants an iPad… we wonder if elected officials are willing to contort financial reality and ignore open meeting law requirements in order to play with an iPad on the taxpayers dime.  This USA today report says city councils are buying iPads to save the cost of paper.  But they might be buying a whole lot of trouble that will make the paper budget seem trivial.

City of San Francisco’s former network administrator Terry Childs was sentenced to 4 years for locking the city out of its network.  He’s been cooling his heels in jail for two years during the trial, and now it looks like he’ll serve about another 6 months with credit for time served. The San Francisco Weekly had the best summary of the case, and seems to be the only media outlet that truly grasps the moral of the Terry Childs story.

Attention merchants and other businesses relying on credit card purchases. PCI 2.0 is coming in October, and will probably become effective in January.  Yes, it will require more of you. Here is the current standard. The new standard will require web application logging, and better accountability and tracking of credit card number within the business network.

Apple iPhone Patches have been distributed for devices affected by the jailbreakme flaw.  Problem is, the patches work selectively. They do not apply to all devices.  Available for: iOS 2.0 through 4.0.1 for iPhone 3G and later, iOS 2.1 through 4.0 for iPod touch (2nd generation) and later. Here’s Apple’s report on the flaw.  Jay Freeman (Saurik) has made an unofficial patch for one (CVE-2010-1797) of the two vulnerabilities patched by Apple. It’s available for Jailbroken devices via Cydia,  and will work also on the older devices that have not yet received any updates from Apple, plus new devices if you don’t want to use Apple’s update.

Adobe Flash problems aren’t solved after upgrades.

Cybercriminals are already gearing up for the holidays, creating booby traps for likely Halloween and Thanksgiving search terms.

Did your shrink leave town for a convention this week?  If (s)he is attending the San Diego gathering of the American Psychological Association, you might want to text him or her, and warn about the social networking app the convention organizers have made available.  Seems the attendee code on the ID badges double as the log-in codes for the shrink network.  Oops… one wrong digit and you can view someone else’s conference registration data.

CyberJungle FAQ

1. From Steve: Our small business is running rather old PCs. Many of them are over 7 years old, and they take for ever to boot up. We are on a tight budget, we are seeing refurbished PCs with XP and new PCs with Windows7, is it worth the extra money to upgrade to Windows7? Will we get improved security?

A: YES, and your company can purchase refurbished PCs running Windows7. Get the 64 bit version, and upgrade to Office2010, for improved security and productivity.

2. From Malik: We are having a lot problems with our business email server. We are a company with less than 20 employees, but we are spending a lot of money with our IT guy on the server, where the email, and our filesve. He says we should buy a new server. The one we have is about 5 years old. Should we buy a new server, or, should we look at switching to something like gmail?

A: Get a new, smaller file server that runs Windows2008, or (even better) Linux. Buy business-grade email services from a quality firm that offers hosted Microsoft Exchange, or Open Source Zimbra.

3. Andrew: Our employees want to use their own iPads at work. They want to access work files, do email, take notes, and do other tasks. If they want to buy the iPads on their own, what are the risks to our business.

A: Plenty. Ediscovery, loss of business data, are just two. Wait a few months as business-grade alternatives to iPads are released. They are just about to be launched into the market for just your situation.

Episode 162 – su root edition:

This is our unedited edition, featuring a longer and more technical conversation with Wayne Huang of Armorize, discussing his early research that led to the discovery of drive-by downloads  The audio file is 35 minutes long.

You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below, or you can go to the listening options page and browse for other ways to hear the show.

To listen to su root edition (episode 162)  via the flash player:

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