May 23, 2010 – Episode 139

Interview Segment:

Josh Levy, a writer, internet strategist, and the organizer of a project called “pledge to leave facebook.” The interview is 9 minutes long, and it starts about 56 minutes into the show. Episode 139 is 1 hour and 12 minutes long. You can hear it by clicking on the flash player below, or click on the listening options page for other ways to listen.

To listen to Episode 139 via the flash player:

Our take on this week’s news:

Co-host Ira Victor is out of town.  Lee Rowland from the ACLU of Nevada sits in as guest co-host for a first-hour privacy round-up.  Recent issues include:

The Houston Police Department recently held a secret (no media allowed) event where the invited guests contemplated the use of drone aircraft for domestic law enforcement.  Nonetheless,  one news outlet got wind of it, and stationed its television cameras on the property next door. They caught the launch of the drone on camera.  Cops say they aren’t sure how they’ll use the technology, but aren’t ruling out anything. Watch the whole report.  It’s about four minutes long.

Incoming U.C. Berkeley freshmen are being encouraged to offer a  DNA sample.  And why were RFID chips implanted in Alzheimers patients without proper oversight?

TSA continues to roll out the full body scanning machines to airports across the nation.  Passengers don’t seem to be aware that they can opt for a pat-down instead of a virtual strip search.

Tough week for Facebook.  The Wall Street Journal reports the company gave personal info to advertisers. EFF offers insight.

On the heels of a CBS news investigative report about the data left on copy machine hard drives, the FTC is applying pressure to the makers of the machines to educate customers about scrubbing the hard drives.  (Xerox is leading the pack, according to one account.)

The first-ever jail sentence for a HIPAA violation has been imposed. We wonder why this guy was informed he was about to be fired, and then allowed to hang around and access patient records repeatedly.

Todd Davis of LifeLock told the world his social security number as an advertising gimmick, trying to prove a point, of course.  His identity has been successfully stolen 13 times since being “covered” by LifeLock.

Not cool enough for a mac?  Why the Apple Store refused to sell an iPad to a disabled woman. (She wanted to pay cash. Apple’s iPad policy was credit or debit card only.) And why Apple relented, and delivered the device to her home a few days later. (San Francisco television consumer reporter Michael Finney and his news feature “7 on Your Side” shamed them into it.)

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